Counting Points

 

The enemy bidding (or lack of bidding) sets their range of HCP's, and the alert player remembers this information during the play of the hand.

 

Related Play Problems                   Play Problem 47

                                                        Play Problem 115

                                                        Play Problem 124

                                                        Play Problem 174

                                                        Play Problem 228

 

Related Extracts from Past Wednesday Games

 

 

 28

♠ KT976

KQJ73

Q

♣ Q3

 

 

 

From 6th August, 2008

♠ QJ8

A

AKT2

♣ AJT95

          North

West             East

         
South

♠ A543

T84

865

♣ 642

 
Dlr     West
Vul     N-S 


 
 
 
 
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♠ 2

9652

J9743

♣ K97

West    North   East     South

1♣       1♠        Pass    Pass

1NT     2       Pass    Pass

Dbl      Pass    3♣       3

Pass    Pass    Pass

 

The play in Hearts is most interesting!

            Club Two to the Ten and Declarerís Queen

            Spade Ten to Westís Jack

            A is cashed

            K is cashed

            A♣ is cashed

            Club to the King, Declarer pitching a Spade

            Heart to the King

            Spade ruff

            Diamond ruff

With 4 cards left, and Declarer needing all the tricks, here is the end-position:

                                    Declarer

                                    ♠ KT

                                    QJ

                                   

                                    ♣

            West                                        East

            ♠ Q                                         ♠ A5

            ♥                                             T

            ♦ A2                                        8

            ♣ T                                          ♣

                                    Dummy

                                   

                                    9

                                    J97

                                    ♣

Looking at all 4 hands itís clear enough that Declarer makes the rest by leading the K♠, squashing Westís Queen.  But will that be obvious to Declarer?  Hereís what can be deduced:

-         The A♠ is with East.  West has already shown up with J♠, A, AK, AJ♣, thatís 17 HCPís.  Surely West cannot also have the A♠, that would be too much.

-         What is the enemy distribution?  Thatís a bit harder to fathom than the missing high cards.  Letís give West 5 Clubs (perhaps East would have supported with 4, perhaps his opening lead was 3rd best).  Did West start out life as 4=1=3=5 or 3=1=4=5?  It wonít be obvious!

Anyway, full marks if you realized that the A♠ had to be with East, and bad luck if you misguessed the distribution.

 

 26

♠ J87

AJ6

A2

♣ Q9865

 

 

 

From 6th August, 2008

♠ AKT953

KT3

96

♣ K7

          North

West             East

          South

♠ 2

985

KJT8

♣ JT432

 
Dlr     East
Vul     Both 


 
 
 
 
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♠ Q64

Q742

Q7543

♣ A

West    North   East     South

                        Pass    Pass

1♠        Pass    Pass    1NT

2♠        Pass    Pass    Pass

 

South might well have passed 1♠, but her actual choice of 1NT worked better, pushing West one level too high (and perhaps North should have doubled 2♠!).  Just making 7 tricks requires some detective work by Declarer:

            Club to the Ace

            Heart to Northís Jack

            Club ruff

            Heart to the Ace

            Club (in case a trump promotion is required), ruffed by the Queen and overruffed

            K♠ is cashed

            T♠ to Northís Jack

            Spade return

Now, Declarer plays a low Diamond towards the board, North casually playing low.  Can Declarer guess the Diamond situation?  He should!  By now, South (who passed originally) will have shown up with Q♠, Q and A♣.  Surely there is no room in her hand for the A, so Dummyís K wins the tricks and itís down only one.

 

 

 16

♠ 75

KJT83

KJ6

♣ KJ6

 

 

 

From 5th November, 2009

♠ KQ8

96

AQ74

♣ Q973

          North

West             East

          South

♠ AJ6

A54

T932

♣ 842

 

Dlr     West
Vul     E-W 


 
 
 
 
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 All Rights Reserved

♠ T9432

Q72

85

♣ AT5

West    North   East     South

1        1        2        2

All Pass

 

Perhaps it was a bit feeble for East to sell out to 2, but it turns out to be the right decision on the actual board.  If West plays in 3 it will be -200 thanks to the unlucky Diamond situation.  As for North playing in 2, she, of course, has a most fortunate Diamond situation and that allows 9 tricks to be made, possibly without the need to guess the Club Queen.  For example:

            T lead to Westís Ace

            Heart to Eastís Ace

            Heart to Southís Queen

            Diamond finesse

            K pitching a Club

            Cash A♣, K♣, and ruff a Club

Of course, East might find the fine opening lead of a low trump, after which Dummyís trumps will be extracted before the Club ruff can be taken.  So now, Declarer will have to guess the location of the Q♣.  Will she?  Probably, by the time that the moment of truth arrives she should be able to figure out that West needs that Q♣ for his opening bid.

 

 8

♠ A732

K52

QT7653




From 3rd January, 2007

♠ J

863

AJ84

♣ AQ543

          North

West             East

          South

♠ 854

AJ94

92

♣ 8762

 

Dlr     West
Vul     None 


 
 
 
 
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♠ KQT96

QT7

K

♣ KJT9

West    North   East     South

1♣       1        1        1♠

Dbl      2♠        Pass    2NT

Pass    4♠        All Pass

 

4♠ is a fine contract.  There are two Aces to be lost and the real question is whether or not Declarer can muster up 11 tricks.  Two lines present themselves:

-         Set up the Diamonds Ö this will require 3-3 Diamonds or doubleton Jack and trumps 2-2, more adverse splits will be impossible to handle.

-         Try two ruffing finesses in Clubs, making 11 tricks when West has both the Ace and the Queen.

If there was any doubt as to the better line that disappears the moment West leads a low Heart, to Eastís Jack and Declarerís Queen.  Now, East is marked with the A and J, which leaves just 12 enemy points unaccounted for Ö surely West needs them to justify the opening bid and will hold ♣AQ.  So, Declarer wins the Q, leads the K♣ covered by the Ace and ruffed, crosses back on a trump and takes another Club ruffing finesse, for 11 tricks.

 

 24

♠ A76

Q74

KJ3

♣ T854


 

 

From 2nd Jamuary, 2008

♠ 9842

KJT3

T765

♣ 3

          North

Dummy       East

          South

♠ KQJT3

85

Q4

♣ AKJ6

 

Dlr     West
Vul     None 


 
 
 
 
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♠ 5

A962

A982

♣ Q972

West    North   East     South

Pass    Pass    1♠        Dbl

2♠        Dbl      Pass    2NT

3♠        Pass    Pass    Pass

 

Against 3♠, South will probably lead a Club, which is not as bad for the defense as it looks, itís merely one less Club to be ruffed on the board.  The play might go as follows:

            Club to Declarerís Jack

            Club ruff

            Spade to the King

            Q♠ won by Northís Ace

            Spade return

Declarer will make his contract if he guesses the Hearts correctly, and he surely should if he reflects upon the bidding and the play:

-         South made a Takeout Double

-         North has show up with the A♠

-         Southís opening lead surely means that she does not have both the A and Q.

The indications are that South has the A, without that card her Takeout Double would have been made with 8 or 9 HCPís.  Making 9 tricks thanks to a little counting.

 

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